New Heart Treatment Used to Narrow Vein Transports Blood from Heart to Lungs

It seems totally outrageous, but surgeons have found a fresh method by obstructing an important vein in one's heart to alleviate the pain of formerly untreatable angina. The illness, which affects about two million Britons, happens when narrowed arteries that are diseased reduce the flow that supplies blood to the heart muscle. First-line treatment includes surgery and drugs to insert stents – miniature expandable wire mesh tubes to prop them open. The process, alleviates the symptoms of angina, which contains occasionally debilitating chest pain typically activated by exertion and angioplasty, restores the circulation.

Others are offered heart-bypass operation, which includes planting it around one's heart and taking a vein from elsewhere within the body, restoring the flow of blood. In a move described by one top surgeon as ‘counter intuitive’, a fresh type of stainless steel stent which is formed like a hourglass is used to narrow the vein that carries blood, the coronary sinus. The narrowing causes smaller relieving angina pain, increasing blood flow elsewhere and surrounding arteries to dilate. The implant is added via a tiny incision in the jugular vein.

A guide wire, with a deflated balloon inside it and the collapsed net implant on the end, is subsequently pushed through. The balloon can be used to inflate the ends, leaving a narrow middle part once it's in the right place. Cardiologist Dr Steven Lindsay, who's fitting the apparatus said: ‘Life for patients with refractory angina is quite hopeless. We've patients who discover they've been in pain simply walking from room to room at house. Others live in continuous anxiety they are having a heart attack, although this isn’t the situation as the chest pain is intense –. This is this kind of difficulty that we really offer them to help them make do.’ The illness isn't lethal, but frequently feels like a heaviness in the chest that might propagate to neck, the arms, jaw, back or belly.

Some sufferers describe an atmosphere of tightness that is intense, while some say it's more of a dull pain. The episodes generally subside after a short while. Angina, which changes about two million Britons, happens when narrowed arteries that are diseased reduce the flow that supplies blood to the heart muscle Angina, which changes about two million Britons, happens when narrowed arteries that are diseased reduce the flow that supplies blood to the heart muscle. Dr Lindsay included: When we first learned about this new process ‘ it appeared counterintuitive that the flow of blood could be helped by narrowing a vein, but studies have shown it to be safe and effective. We warn patients they won’t feel any distinct instantly after, as the stent itself does the narrowing is caused by n’t. ‘It’s just once the vein walls begin to grow around the hourglass-formed tube or so the symptoms begin to vanish’ as quoted at diabetes forums

 

One patient to gain is Robert Swift, 65, a retired pipes company owner from Huddersfield, who began suffering at the age of 28 from angina. He was fitted with the new apparatus two years ago. At the time without suffering an episode he was often tormented with chest pain and cannot climb the stairs to bed. He said: ‘it'sn’t treated my angina, but I don’t get an episode only getting up from my seat, which was the case formerly.’ The former smoker has had a quadruple bypass and has had four coronary stents. You may find more information on the article at type 2 diabetes forum

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